Harmar Cemetery, west Marietta, Ohio

Harmar Cemetery is located across the Muskingum River in the western part of Marietta.  It is a little tricky to get too.  We were coming north on Hwy 7 and exited off at Gilman, if memory serves, and then drove to Stone Street.  This sign points the way and states that due to weather and flooding the earliest stones were destroyed.

Harmar Cemetery in Marietta.

Harmar Cemetery in Marietta.

Here are two overview photographs of this old cemetery.  As I walked around this burial site I felt sad because it was not in very good shape with broken stones and large empty areas where there maybe once were tombstones.

Harmar Cemetery looking west

Harmar Cemetery looking west

Harmar Cemetery overview photos

Harmar Cemetery overview photos

There is a publication about this cemetery:

Source:  Burials in Harmar Cemetery, Marietta, Ohio, A Bicentennial Project of the Muskingum Valley Builders 4-H Club, April 7, 1977, Washington Co. Historical Society. 

“The Table of Contents Reads: Prefatory Essay, Abbreviations & Symbols, Over-All Key Map of Harmar Cemetery, Maps of Section 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 5, 7, Burials in Harmar Cemetery, Index to Additional Family Names, Civil War Memorial, Fragmentary Stones. “

Dr. Owen P. Hawley writes in the first chapter .  He describes the history of the cemeteries in the area and cites names of the burials giving information on the individuals mentioned.  He researched the Ohio Company records, history books, city records, the newspaper and more.  Mr. Hawley is the author of the Mound Cemetery book I have mentioned in past posts.

Here is the table tombstone for Noah Fearing:

Noah Fearing Tombstone

Noah Fearing Tombstone

The tombstone of Henry Fearing 1798 to 1894 and more:

Henry Fearing Burial in Harmar

Henry Fearing Burial in Harmar

This is the Civil War Monument in Harmar:

Harmar Cemetery Civil War Memorial

Harmar Cemetery Civil War Memorial

More Fearing tombstones and monuments:

More Fearing family tombstones

More Fearing family tombstones

This is Paul Fearing and his wife’s monument.  You will note a stack to the right.  In Ohio they pile the broken stones up into this type of stack which makes it impossible to read them for they are very heavy.

Paul Fearings Tombstone

Paul Fearing”s Tombstone

William Skinner and Mary Chambers etc.

William Skinner in Harmar Cemetery

William Skinner in Harmar Cemetery

Levi Barber and Elizabeth Rouse’s tombstone

Levi Barber 1777 to 1833 and Elizabeth his wife

Levi Barber 1777 to 1833 and Elizabeth his wife

Here are 3 tombstones for the Humphreys family.  As you can see they are flaking and it is difficult to read them:

Flaking tombstones in Harmar - Humphreys

Flaking tombstones in Harmar – Humphreys

Here is another look at the geography of Harmar Cemetery which you can see is on a hill and highway 7 is right along the western border.  The book I mention above talked above slippage of the graves making it hard to figure out what graves belong to whom.

On this particular day we visited, it was cold, very wet and mushy so I stayed pretty close to the bottom of the hill rather than go exploring up into the higher areas.  What I saw are large areas without tombstones and that makes me wonder how many have disappeared over the years with debris covering them and more.

Find A Grave has this cemetery listed as well with 908 stones read with some more details than I list here.

Harmar Cemetery looking northwest

Harmar Cemetery looking northwest

I have visited Mound, Oak Grove and now Harmar Cemetery looking for clues.  So I feel I have a good idea of why it is so difficult to find Solomon’s grave site.

About BJ MacDonald

Interested in travel, really into genealogy and researching my family history, classic novels and movies, fantasy and science fiction, photography, history and more... Here is a tip. I have several blogs, make sure you are commenting on the blog you were visiting and the post you were interested in. My blogs are listed above with thumbnails. Clicking one of them will take you back to the correct blog and then you will have to find the post if you have gotten lost. I can't move a comment once it is made. Sorry about the complications. You can try me here: bjmcdonell@gmail.com
This entry was posted in GOSS Surname, Harmar Cemetery in Marietta, Marietta, Solomon Goss, Washington County, Washington County Historical Society and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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